Causes of Hair Loss

Hair loss is clinically referred to as alopecia and can generally be divided into two types: scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Scarring alopecia involves the inflammation and permanent destruction of the hair follicle complex. It is typically the result of an inflammatory medical condition, usually accompanied by erythema (redness) and scarring.

Non-scarring male and female pattern hair loss (Androgenetic alopecia) is a condition which affects approximately 50% of both men and women over the course of their lifetime. Androgenetic alopecia results in the gradual thinning beginning at the vertex or crown of the scalp to the forehead. By the age of 50 approximately 85% of men have significantly thinning hair – beginning with symptoms around the age of 21. Men commonly show temporal recession and vertex involvement which can progress to total baldness.

Human Hair Growth

The onset of hair loss usually begins in the third or fourth decade but this process can begin immediately after puberty in the most severely affected patients. Androgenetic alopecia usually results in gradual thinning beginning at the vertex or crown of the scalp to the forehead. Women generally show progressive thinning, while men commonly progress to total baldness. By the age of 50 approximately 85% of men have significantly thinning hair – beginning with symptoms around the age of 21.